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Robert Noyce Scholarship Program
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Science

Professor instructing science students in labThe Robert Noyce Scholarship program seeks to increase the number of teachers with a strong content knowledge in science. This National Science Foundation program provides scholarship funds for talented science majors to become teachers in high need school districts. Likewise, scholarships are available for professionals (who already have a bachelors degree) seeking to become science teachers committed to teaching in a high need school. 

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Basic Eligibility

Students who are currently undergraduates in the College of Arts and Sciences who have applied to the Joint B.S/M.S. program (or are planning to) are eligible to be considered for the scholarships. Students who apply under this program are required to agree to teach a minimum of three years in a high need school district.

Undergraduates with science area majors (either B.A. or B.S.) or graduate students who have undergraduate science degrees planning to pursue teacher licensure through the Secondary Transition to Teaching (ST2T) program or the Community of Teachers (COT) program as graduate students are also eligible to apply. 

Career changing professional who already has an undergraduate degree in a science area and are planning to pursue teacher licensure through the ST2T or COT programs are also eligible. Students who apply under the ST2T or COT programs are required to agree to teach a minimum of two years in a high need school district. Recipients who do not teach in a high need district will be responsible for repaying any funds received, including any applicable interest.

Scholarship Award Amount (for undergraduates who will be going into the Joint B.S./M.S. program)

  • $5,000 per semester up to the four semesters that the joint program requires
  • Funds are paid directly into your bursar account for any educational expenses

Scholarship Award amount (for graduate students entering the Secondary Transition to Teaching (ST2T) program or the Community of Teachers (COT) program)

  • $5,000 per semester up to the three semesters that the Secondary Transition to Teaching program or Community of Teachers program requires
  • Funds are paid directly into your bursar account for any educational expenses

Who should apply?

  • Undergraduate B.S. degree majors in Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Geology, or Environmental Science who are seniors in Fall 2010 who are seeking admission to the Joint B.S./M.S. program.
  • Senior B.A. or B.S. majors in Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Geology, or Environmental Science or graduate students with these majors seeking admission to IUB's Secondary Transition to Teaching (ST2T) program or the Community of Teachers (COT) program to begin study in Summer 2011
  • Career changers with undergraduate degrees in the listed areas or closely related areas seeking to attend graduate school to be certified through the Secondary Transition to Teaching or the Community of Teachers programs.

Eligibility requirements:

Applicants for a Noyce stipend must have a commitment to teaching science in a high need school district for at least two years if they receive funding while in the ST2T program or COT program for three years if they receive funding though the Joint B.S./M.S. program.

In addition, students who qualify for a Noyce Scholarship:

  • Have maintained a minimum GPA of 2.5 overall and a minimum GPA of 2.0 in their science area.
  • Are United States citizens, nationals, or permanent residents.
  • Are not in violation of the Anti-Drug Abuse Act and have not been convicted of any felony.

What is a high need district?

The National Science Foundation defines a high need district as one that meets at least one of the following criteria:

  • It has many out-of-field teachers. In particular, the district has at least one school in which: (i) more than 34% of the academic classroom teachers at the secondary level (across all academic subjects) do not have an undergraduate degree with a major or minor in, or a graduate degree in, the academic field in which they teach the majority of their classes; or (ii) more than 34% of the teachers in two of the academic departments do not have an undergraduate degree with a major or minor in, or a graduate degree in, the academic field in which they teach the largest percentage of their classes.
  • It has at least one school whose teacher attrition rate has been 15% or more over the past three years.
  • It has at least one school in which 30% or more of the enrolled students are eligible for participation in the free and reduced lunch program.

This definition fits quite a few districts in Indiana. For example, Monroe County Community School Corporation and Indianapolis Public Schools qualify.

For a listing of School Districts that meet the high need criteria, based upon the criteria of low income, see the U.S. Department of Education website.

Using the Search function you can either check on a particular school or download a listing of schools and school districts for a particular state.

Why teach?

  • Teachers make a difference. Few other careers offer the opportunity to touch more lives.
  • Teaching provides a forum for sharing your passion of science and inspiring young people to achieve their potential.
  • Teaching allows you to challenge yourself and to discover strengths you may never knew you had.
  • Teachers are role models.
  • Teaching provides an opportunity for service by filling the need for qualified science teachers.

Deadlines for Scholarship Consideration

  • Tuesday, November 1, 2011 at 5:00pm is the deadline for applications for Spring Semester 2012. (Joint B.S./M.S. students)

Further information

For further information, please contact:

Application Procedure

Apply online now by clicking this link!

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